Eventi

La Scuola organizza a scadenza regolare incontri pubblici, in proprio o in collaborazione con la Ecole Française d’Extrême-Orient Intersezioni Convegni e workshops Others e altri enti universitari: le Kyoto Lectures, da più di quindici anni rivolte a un pubblico internazionale di studiosi; Manabu, giornate di studio dei ricercatori, borsisti e dottorandi italiani in Giappone; Intersezioni, uno spazio dedicato ai rapporti tra Italia e Giappone nel passato e nel presente, con incontri, dibattiti, seminari e presentazioni di libri. Convegni e workshop fanno ugualmente parte dell'attività scientifica annuale della Scuola.
KL2001のサムネイル

Kyoto Lectures

Environmental Expertise in Modern Japan and the Ashio Copper Mine Case

Cyrian Pitteloud

Italian School of East Asian Studies

29 gennaio 2020 18:00

The Ashio copper mine incident is one of Japan’s first and most famous industrial pollution cases. An industrialist close to the government took charge of the mine in the Tochigi Prefecture mountains at the end of the 1870s. The mine was modernized and extensively worked until, less than fifteen years later, it was fulfilling a third of the nation’s copper needs. The exploitation of this copper deposit on an industrial scale lead to environmental contamination that spread across five prefectures. In response, a protest movement arose that lasted for almost two decades.

The protest movement forms the major part of the case’s historiography. However, while benefiting from its findings, this talk will rather concentrate on the government and the measures it took to handle the social and ecological crisis. Among others, the establishment of pollution investigation committees in 1897 and 1902 is particularly informative, as the process of legitimization towards a public opinion increasingly aware of the events leant largely on data gathered and created by the ocial representatives of fast-growing disciplines (agronomy, medicine, engineering, etc.). Despite its importance, such process of legitimisation-by-scientific- knowledge has been, until now, barely studied.

Cyrian Pitteloud is a research fellow at the University of Geneva and at the École Française d’Extrême Orient in Kyoto. He studied History and Japanese studies at both Geneva and Lausanne universities, and, from 2012 to 2019, he was teaching assistant at the Japanese Unit of the University of Geneva. In November 2019, he completed his Ph.D. He has published a few articles and book chapters about the protest movement against the pollution of the Ashio copper mine, and translated various primary sources in Souyri P. F. (ed.), Japon colonial 1880-1930. Les voix de la dissension, ed. Belles-lettres, 2014.

EFEO salon 3のサムネイル

Convegni e workshops

日本における信仰と「知」のはざま - 中世・近世・近代を中心に - 北白川 EFEO Salon 2019-2020

キリシタン布教における理性と信仰

平岡隆二(京都大学人文科学研究所・准教授)

Italian School of East Asian Studies

21 febbraio 2020 18:00 - 19:30

西洋の科学知識がはじめて伝来したのはキリシタン時代(1549-c.1650)のことだった。特に九州に設置されたイエズス会の神学校(コレジオ)では正式な教育課程の一環として西洋の宇宙論(コスモロジー)がくわしく教授された。また宣教師らがそうした宇宙論知識を日本人に頻繁に紹介していたことも、彼らの手紙や報告、またキリシタン版をはじめとする出版物に多数見いだすことができる。

本報告では、それらの「科学」知識は、彼らが伝道しようとした「宗教」的な知識と分かちがたく結びついていたことを、具体的な史料をあげつつ考察したい。具体的には、その積極的な援用は、教義説明のとくに最初期において、キリスト教的創造神の存在を日本人に確実に証明し、それを足掛かりに他の教義へと展開して洗礼へといたる、という包括的な伝道図式の第一段階に位置づけられていたことを明らかにする。またその作業をつうじて、前近代における自然観や世界認識のあり方、その東西文化における違いや共通点など、より大きな問題群について考えるための手がかりをさぐりたい。

EFEO salon 2_Lachaud_Macのサムネイル

Convegni e workshops

日本における信仰と「知」のはざま - 中世・近世・近代を中心に - 北白川 EFEO Salon 2019-2020

「夜の訪問者」−幽霊の比較文化史を考える

フランソワ・ラショウ(フランス国立極東学院・教授)

京都大学人文科学研究所本館1階セミナー室1

17 gennaio 2020 18:00 - 19:30

デファン侯爵夫人は「幽霊の存在を信じていますか」という質問に「いいえ。でも幽霊は怖いですわ」と答えた。18世紀後半のパリのサロン文化の領袖として一世を風靡した彼女に纏わる有名な逸話である。アメリカの独立宣言と同じ年に『雨月物語』が上梓された。サロンのエスプリ感を効かせたデファン侯爵夫人と江戸期の大阪が生んだ「畸人」の上田秋成は「怪奇」を楽しむ近世の代表的な文化人である。

京都・大阪・江戸を中心に全国的なスケールで隆盛期を迎えた「怪談集」・「幽霊譚」の日本と、それに比してヨーロッパは啓蒙主義による「知の体系」として民衆のあいだで長く口伝えされてきた昔話・メルヘンの怪奇譚蒐集に傾倒した。近世日本の幽霊譚と宗教改革を乗り越えたヨーロッパの亡霊出現の物語は「幻想文学」の誕生にも繋がる。

本発表では幕末・明治期 の漢学者・画家の石川鴻斎の『夜窓鬼談』と古文書・ゴシック建築の碩学のモンタギュー・ロウズ・ジェイムズの『好古家の幽霊譚』から時代を遡り、近世の文献における東アジアとヨーロッパの「幽霊の比較文化史」の可能性を探り、「幽霊像」の変遷の意義について考察する。

KL2002のサムネイル

Kyoto Lectures

Art, Gender, and Community in an Age of Revolution

The Life of a Samurai Housewife and Artist in Kishu Domain, 1830-1880

Simon Partner

Italian School of East Asian Studies

7 febbraio 2020 18:00

This presentation will focus on the life of Kawai Koume, an artist and housewife from a lower-ranking samurai family of Kishu domain (now Wakayama prefecture), from the 1830s through the 1870s. Using this female and regional perspective, the presentation will examine the lived experience of upheaval, conict, revolution, and social and political transformation. It will focus in particular on what it meant to be a female artist in the samurai community of Wakayama castle town, both before and after the Meiji Restoration. Topics to be introduced will include a portrait of the samurai, merchant and artisan communities of Wakayama; a discussion of the education and opportunities open to samurai women of Kishu domain; and an analysis of the cultural and social environment of female artists like Koume. The presentation will argue that the social and political transformations of the bakumatsu and early Meiji periods created both opportunities and challenges for a female artist, to which Kawai Koume attempted to adapt with mixed success.

Simon Partner is Professor of History at Duke University in the USA. His interest in Japanese history ‘from the bottom up’ has led him to focus on the lives of little-known individuals – farmers, workers, merchants, and housewives. He has published four biographies based on this research, most recently The Merchant’s Tale: Yokohama and the Transformation of Japan (Columbia University Press, 2017). He is currently a Visiting Research Scholar at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies (Nichibunken), where he is working on a history of the Restoration era as seen through the life of Kawai Koume.

UCERLERのサムネイル

Convegni e workshops

Chinese Christian Books in Nagasaki

From Censorship to Circulation

M. Antoni J. Ucerler, S.J.

Italian School of East Asian Studies

17 dicembre 2019 18:00

In the aftermath of the prohibition of Christianity in Japan in 1614, the authorities realized that Christian books written by the Jesuit missionaries in China in classical Chinese (kanbun) were still coming into the country and circulating among the populace and among scholars. These books were imported into Nagasaki by Chinese merchants, some of whom were Christian. The discovery of Christian texts and objects led the authorities to appoint the head of the Shuntokuji Buddhist Temple 春徳寺 (Nagasaki) in 1630 as censor of imported books.

The shogunate subsequently established the official position of “inspector of books” (shomotsu aratame-yaku 書物改役) and entrusted it to the Mukai family, which was in charge of the Nagasaki Confucian Academy (長崎聖堂). They were to ensure that no prohibited works were imported from China through the Chinese Quarters (唐人屋敷). Besides promoting orthodox Confucian learning—the official ideology of the Tokugawa state—the Academy’s function was to be vigilant against Christian ideas being introduced through Chinese books.

The ban on the import of Jesuit scientific works from China was eased in 1720. New archival evidence reveals, however, that Christian doctrinal texts in classical Chinese continued to circulate in “illegal” manuscript copies among curious Edo scholars for over two centuries.

M. Antoni J. Ucerler, S.J. (D.Phil., Oxon.) is Director of the Ricci Institute for Chinese-Western Cultural History and Associate Professor of East Asian Studies at the University of San Francisco. He previously taught at Sophia University (Tokyo), the University of Oxford, and Georgetown University (Washington, D.C.) He is also co-editor of the new Brill series, Studies in the History of Christianity in East Asia. His research concentrates on the history of Christianity in Japan and its comparative history in East Asia. Among his publications are: Compendia compiled by Pedro Gómez. Jesuit College of Japan, (ed.), 3 vols. (Tokyo, 1997), Christianity and Cultures. Japan and China in Comparison (1543-1644) (ed.) (Rome, 2009), and The Samurai and the Cross: Reinventing Christianity in Early Modern Japan (Oxford, forthcoming 2020).