Eventi

La Scuola organizza a scadenza regolare incontri pubblici, in proprio o in collaborazione con la Ecole Française d’Extrême-Orient Intersezioni Convegni e workshops Others e altri enti universitari: le Kyoto Lectures, da più di quindici anni rivolte a un pubblico internazionale di studiosi; Manabu, giornate di studio dei ricercatori, borsisti e dottorandi italiani in Giappone; Intersezioni, uno spazio dedicato ai rapporti tra Italia e Giappone nel passato e nel presente, con incontri, dibattiti, seminari e presentazioni di libri. Convegni e workshop fanno ugualmente parte dell'attività scientifica annuale della Scuola.
KL1911のサムネイル

Kyoto Lectures

Early Encounters of Shin Buddhism with Shintō

“Interreligious” Contacts and Hagiography

Markus Rüsch

Italian School of East Asian Studies

28 novembre 2019 18:00

Shin Buddhism is often considered to be the tradition that most radically disassociates itself from Shintō from the very beginning of its history. This is evident in one of the most well-known biographies of its founder, Shinran (1173–1263) as well as—to a significant extent—in Shinran’s own writings. However, the question of the relationship between Amida Buddha, various kami,  and other Buddhist deities remained an open question.

In fact, a strategy for inclusion or exclusion of so-called “alien” religious denominations is a significant concern that Shin Buddhism shares with basically  all the Buddhist sects in Japan. This talk will try to shed light on different approaches within Shin Buddhism, focussing on the writings of Kakunyo (1271–1351) and Zonkaku (1290–1373), and discussing strategies and arguments that lead to nearly opposite understandings of the relationship with Shintō. In this context, the connections between hagiography and doctrine have particular significance for the self-consciousness of a religious group. As it will be argued, hagiography is not merely a political tool to legitimize power, but also a place where an author can develop forms of doctrinal debate.

Markus Rüsch is currently JSPS International Research Fellow at Ryukoku University (Kyoto). He studied Japanese Studies and Philosophy, and holds a PhD in Japanese Studies from the Freie Universität in Berlin. He has published a few articles on the subject of hagiography, Japanese Buddhist thought, and Japanese philosophy. This year his doctoral thesis was published in Germany by Iudicium Verlag with the title Argumente des Heiligen: Rhetorische Mittel und narrative Strukturen in Hagiographien am Beispiel des japanischen Mönchs Shinran.

KL1912のサムネイル

Kyoto Lectures

Between the Meiji Restoration and Ezo Republic

The Boshin War Viewed from Hakodate

Steven Ivings

Italian School of East Asian Studies

10 dicembre 2019 18:00

The Boshin War (1868-69) fought between the Tokugawa Shogunate and an alliance of domains rallying around the Japanese emperor was a major turning point in Japanese history and heralded in the Meiji era. Utilizing the British consular reports from Hakodate as well as several other eyewitness accounts, this talk will offer an insight into the activities and opinions of foreign traders and consuls during this crucial period. Located in the far north of the Japanese realm, the treaty port of Hakodate switched hands several times between the Shogunate and Imperial forces, and in the final phase of the Boshin War Hakodate was occupied for seven months by the so-called “Ezo Republic” which offered the final resistance to the Meiji regime. The sources provide on-the-ground insight into the reality of the shifting conflict, foreign diplomacy, and the activities of foreign traders who sold weapons and conveyed troops during this tumultuous period. In the talk eyewitness accounts of the Battle of Hakodate, a naval and land battle fought between strikingly modern forces which drew the curtain on the Boshin War will be presented. The view from Hakodate allows us to revise several aspects of the popular images of both the Tokugawa and Meiji regimes.

Steven Ivings is a senior lecturer at the Graduate School of Economics, Kyoto University. After completing his PhD at the London School of Economics in 2014 he worked at Heidelberg University as an assistant professor in cultural economic history before joining Kyoto University in 2017. He is a socio-economic historian who has published on aspects of colonial and postcolonial migration in the Northeast Asia, and the history of trade and economic development in Hokkaido and Karafuto (now Sakhalin).

UCERLERのサムネイル

Convegni e workshops

Chinese Christian Books in Nagasaki

From Censorship to Circulation

M. Antoni J. Ucerler, S.J.

Italian School of East Asian Studies

17 dicembre 2019 18:00

In the aftermath of the prohibition of Christianity in Japan in 1614, the authorities realized that Christian books written by the Jesuit missionaries in China in classical Chinese (kanbun) were still coming into the country and circulating among the populace and among scholars. These books were imported into Nagasaki by Chinese merchants, some of whom were Christian. The discovery of Christian texts and objects led the authorities to appoint the head of the Shuntokuji Buddhist Temple 春徳寺 (Nagasaki) in 1630 as censor of imported books.

The shogunate subsequently established the official position of “inspector of books” (shomotsu aratame-yaku 書物改役) and entrusted it to the Mukai family, which was in charge of the Nagasaki Confucian Academy (長崎聖堂). They were to ensure that no prohibited works were imported from China through the Chinese Quarters (唐人屋敷). Besides promoting orthodox Confucian learning—the official ideology of the Tokugawa state—the Academy’s function was to be vigilant against Christian ideas being introduced through Chinese books.

The ban on the import of Jesuit scientific works from China was eased in 1720. New archival evidence reveals, however, that Christian doctrinal texts in classical Chinese continued to circulate in “illegal” manuscript copies among curious Edo scholars for over two centuries.

M. Antoni J. Ucerler, S.J. (D.Phil., Oxon.) is Director of the Ricci Institute for Chinese-Western Cultural History and Associate Professor of East Asian Studies at the University of San Francisco. He previously taught at Sophia University (Tokyo), the University of Oxford, and Georgetown University (Washington, D.C.) He is also co-editor of the new Brill series, Studies in the History of Christianity in East Asia. His research concentrates on the history of Christianity in Japan and its comparative history in East Asia. Among his publications are: Compendia compiled by Pedro Gómez. Jesuit College of Japan, (ed.), 3 vols. (Tokyo, 1997), Christianity and Cultures. Japan and China in Comparison (1543-1644) (ed.) (Rome, 2009), and The Samurai and the Cross: Reinventing Christianity in Early Modern Japan (Oxford, forthcoming 2020).

KL1910のサムネイル

Kyoto Lectures

The French Campaign Against Imports of Japanese Cultured Pearls in the Interwar Years

William G. Clarence-Smith

Italian School of East Asian Studies

31 ottobre 2019 18:00

Various entrepreneurs experimented with producing cultured pearls from the early 1890s, but it was only after the First World War that Japan began to export round specimens on any scale. The arrival of relatively cheap Japanese cultured pearls on the world market alarmed established dealers in natural pearls, as well as producers, leading to a series of counter-measures and lawsuits. Paris, then the de facto capital of the Western world’s pearling economy, witnessed the most protracted and bitter disputes, which lasted almost to the end of the interwar years. At the centre of the storm was Lucien Pohl, who acted as the Paris agent of Mikimoto Kokichi, the most significant Japanese exporter of cultured pearls. Pohl came from a family of Alsatian Jewish traders, who had set up shop in Yokohama shortly after the Meiji Restoration. Pohl battled the French association of jewellers, who developed a series of scientific techniques to distinguish between the two types of pearls, and who sought to have cultured pearls legally designated as ‘fake’ or ‘imitation’ goods. In the end, a compromise was reached, whereby cultured pearls had to be clearly labelled as such, but could be freely sold.

William Gervase Clarence-Smith is Emeritus Professor of History, SOAS University of London. He is a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society, and of the Royal Historical Society. He is researching pearling around the world, with a chapter forthcoming in Pearls, people, and power: pearling and Indian Ocean worlds, Ohio University Press. He also works on sponges, whales, and fish, and, more broadly, on beverages, masticatories, narcotics, manufacturing, diasporas, slavery, sexuality, and Islam. With Ed Emery, he has organized SOAS-based conferences on non-human animals since 2010, on donkeys, mules, war-horses, camels, elephants, and sponges.

KL1909のサムネイル

Kyoto Lectures

The Multiple Faces of Japanese Military Disobedience, 1868-1937

Roots and Consequences

Danny Orbach

Italian School of East Asian Studies

19 settembre 2019 18:00

Many people in the West associate the Imperial Japanese Army with blind obedience to authority. Notorious for following superiors to certain death, Japanese soldiers in the Pacic War evoked among their enemies unsavory images such as “cattle”, “herd” or “beehive.” And yet, the imperial Japanese army was arguably one of the most disobedient armed forces in modern history. Japanese ocers repeatedly staged coup d’états, violent insurrections and political assassinations, phenomena which peaked in the 1870s and in the 1930s.

Between these two periods, other ocers incessantly resisted orders given by both government and high command. In the lecture, we shall examine the many faces of Japanese military disobedience and its dynamics, feeding from basic structural aws in the modern Japanese polity. Finally, we shall discuss whether military disobedience, in its multiple forms, helped to drive Japan into the Second-Sino Japanese War and the Pacic War.

Danny Orbach is an assistant professor in the departments of history and Asian studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is a military historian, who published on subjects such as military resistance, war atrocities and free-lance military adventurers. His two latest books are The Plots against Hitler and Curse on this Country: The Rebellious Army of Imperial Japan. The Japanese translation of the latest book is forthcoming in Asahi Shinbun Press. Currently, he works on the history of intelligence in the early Cold War.